History of Canada – Within 300 Years

History of Canada may not seem to be reach but it has its own bright spots. Canada shares its borders with the United States to the south and northwest, and three oceans to the east, west and north. It is also surrounded by Arctic Ocean to its north. Canada is one of the world’s most geographically diverse countries due to its size and location on the continent; approximately 90% of it lies in fresh water, while 70% is covered by forest (including 16 million lakes) or semi-desert. This contrasts with 60 million Americans who live mostly on an exposed land mass between two large oceans that contain only 10 million lakes. In winter, Canada has cool days but mostly mild nights; however, nearly all summer days are warm enough for swimming at many beaches.

Community of the First Nations

The First Nations are the original inhabitants of history of Canada, who have lived in Canada for thousands of years. They have a rich culture and history that has been often overlooked by Canadian society as a whole. In fact, many First Nations people still live on reserves today and their communities are suffering from many issues due to poverty, poor housing conditions, lack of access to clean water and so on.

The First Nations have been fighting for their rights for hundreds of years and continue to fight today for recognition of their land ownership claims as well as improved living conditions for all those living within these communities.

History of Canada: Arrival of the French

In 1534, French explorer Jacques Cartier first arrived in Canada and claimed the land for France. French explorers Samuel de Champlain and Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Mons founded Quebec City in 1608 at The Forks of the Saint Lawrence River. This was the first settlement in Canadian history.

War of 1812

The War of 1812 was fought between the United States (history of the United States of America)¬†and its former colonial power, Great Britain, and its North American colonies. It took place between 1812 and 1814 and was a result of America’s desire to expand its territory while Great Britain tried to limit American expansion. In order to win the war, both sides had to rely heavily on their navies because land fighting was rare due to the fact that neither side managed to mount an offensive against each other’s capital cities (Washington D.C., for the Americans; London for the British).

History of Canada: Treaty of Paris (1763)

The Treaty of Paris (1763) ended the Seven Years’ War, also known as the French and Indian War. It marked the beginning of British dominance in North America. The treaty was signed on Feb. 10, 1763 by representatives from France and Great Britain at the Palace of Fontainebleau outside Paris, France.

The treaty ceded history of Canada and all its possessions east of the Mississippi River to Great Britain along with Florida as far south as Mobile Bay. In return, France was given Guadeloupe in the Caribbean Sea plus St Christopher Island and Dominica Island to be held by them until further notice or confirmation from their respective governments.

When Great Britain Tried to Limit American Expansion

The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and its former colonial power, Great Britain, and its North American colonies. It took place between 1812 and 1814 and was a result of America’s desire to expand its territory while Great Britain tried to limit American expansion.

In the spring of 1812, when President James Madison asked Congress to declare war on Great Britain, he cited several reasons for going to war:

  • The impressment of American sailors by British naval ships (the kidnapping or forced recruitment into military service). The U.S. argued that this practice was illegal under international law.
  • The British practice of searching neutral vessels at sea during wartime without first determining whether they were carrying contraband goods or not (contraband goods are those prohibited from being traded during wartime).
  • The construction of military fortifications along the Canadian border in Upper Canada (present-day Ontario) to prevent cross-border attacks by Americans into Upper Canada or Lower Canada (present-day Quebec).

This is it

The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and its former colonial power, Great Britain, and its North American colonies. It took place between 1812 and 1814 and was a result of America’s desire to expand its territory while Great Britain tried to limit American expansion. At the time of the war, both countries were still empires but had different reasons for fighting each other; one wanted more land while another wanted more control over their people. The end result was not just a loss for either side but also an understanding that this type of warfare would never happen again as well because no one really won anything except some pride (which wasn’t much). This article was brought to you by Edge of the Globe’s History. Thank you for reading.

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